Astronomers find a new type of planet: The 'mega-Earth'

science:

Typically, planets much larger than Earth would be gas giants. That’s what we thought, anyway. But now astronomers have discovered an exoplanet seventeen times heavier than Earth, made up of rock and solids, some 560 light-years away. Not only is the planet exceptionally large for its composition, it’s also surprisingly old. Its parent solar system is 11 billion years old. In order to make the heavier elements needed to create an earthy planet, you require stellar nucleosynthesis—stars merging atomic nuclei into successively heavier elements until they explode, dispersing the mass, which can then form planets. There weren’t a whole lot of heavy elements present in the universe less than three billion years after the Big Bang, but apparently, there was enough to create Kepler-10c. Fascinating.

Think of the implications for life elsewhere in the universe. Although we have yet to confirm its existence, the conditions conducive to it could have appeared much earlier than one would have thought.

Look what Dan found!  City Woods…in Syracuse!  
“He knows every detail of the more than 50 locally milled trees in his shop. Each has its own story. There’s a tree from Thornden Park here. One from Tipp Hill there. The black walnut that’s his pride and joy came from Redfield Ave.
"When a tree is blocking a power line or needs to be removed, the city hires contractors to cut them down," he says. "Usually they get made into mulch or wood chips. So I’ll pay or finagle to get them instead."
He mills the trees in the “Bone Yard” behind the factory and then brings them to his shop to dry and fashion. It takes about one year for every inch of thickness for a piece of wood to dry.”
http://www.syracuse.com/entertainment/index.ssf/2013/10/inside_the_gear_factory_syracuse.html

Look what Dan found!  City Woods…in Syracuse!  

He knows every detail of the more than 50 locally milled trees in his shop. Each has its own story. There’s a tree from Thornden Park here. One from Tipp Hill there. The black walnut that’s his pride and joy came from Redfield Ave.

"When a tree is blocking a power line or needs to be removed, the city hires contractors to cut them down," he says. "Usually they get made into mulch or wood chips. So I’ll pay or finagle to get them instead."

He mills the trees in the “Bone Yard” behind the factory and then brings them to his shop to dry and fashion. It takes about one year for every inch of thickness for a piece of wood to dry.”

http://www.syracuse.com/entertainment/index.ssf/2013/10/inside_the_gear_factory_syracuse.html

Amy, Sarah and Brandon present in progress scenario plot to 4th year review panel: Gena Morgis, Ben Bosclair and Charlie Oddo.  Thanks reviewers!!

Amy, Sarah and Brandon present in progress scenario plot to 4th year review panel: Gena Morgis, Ben Bosclair and Charlie Oddo.  Thanks reviewers!!

Representing a ‘Thickened’ Landscape

Anthropologist Geertz suggests that “thin description is an unadorned, first-order account of behavior.  But thick description adds many layers of cultural significance; it confronts a multiplicity of complex conceptual structures, many of them superimposed upon or knotted into one another, which a researcher must contrive somehow to grasp and then to render.  Landscape researchers and designers must also examine, decipher, and appreciate the complex structures and processes that constitute a given landscape or site through reading, writing, and drawing, and eventually through design and site transformation.”

"What then are the means and methods that determine thick readings of landscape architectural projects, and what do thick drawings look like?"

-Blanchon and Gill

Yes, forests for timber production take time.  But let’s not forget that experience of the forest is immediate and evolving.  These protection structures at the National Arboretum in Canberra, Australia provide a striking visual experience even when trees are very young.

Yes, forests for timber production take time.  But let’s not forget that experience of the forest is immediate and evolving.  These protection structures at the National Arboretum in Canberra, Australia provide a striking visual experience even when trees are very young.

"But few designers have yet ventured beyond the metaphors and mechanics supplied by these ecological models to design effectively for adaptation to change, or to incorporate learned feedback into the designs, or to work in transdisciplinary modes of practice that open new apertures for the exploration of new systems, synergies and wholly collaborative work. This is the project ahead: leading the sciences, humanities, and design culture toward a more rigorous, robust and relevant engagement across the domains of ecology and design.”
The closing paragraph for this paper
You are all working on this now!!

"But few designers have yet ventured beyond the metaphors and mechanics supplied by these ecological models to design effectively for adaptation to change, or to incorporate learned feedback into the designs, or to work in transdisciplinary modes of practice that open new apertures for the exploration of new systems, synergies and wholly collaborative work. This is the project ahead: leading the sciences, humanities, and design culture toward a more rigorous, robust and relevant engagement across the domains of ecology and design.”

The closing paragraph for this paper

You are all working on this now!!

World Trade Center Memorial: Swamp White Oaks
"Former New York State Governor George Pataki wanted the trees chosen for the memorial to come from states that lost significant numbers of people in the terrorist attacks.  …the challenge for the memorial’s designers was locating the 416 Swamp White Oaks that would occupy the site when it was fully complete.  Over a period of months, Walker’s team traveled throughout New York State searching for eligible Swamp White Oaks in farmers’ fields, public works departments, and in derelict tree nurseries.  Although the shapes of the Swamp White Oaks that were located were almost identical, they came in a variety of different sizes.  To get the hundreds of different-sized trees to conform to Walker and Arad’s geometrically ordered design required a major horticultural operation at a special facility in New Jersey.  With the help of arborists from the international tree-doctor company Bartlett Tree Experts, the trees were hooked up to intravenous drips that starved the bigger ones and fed the smaller ones.  Thus, at the end of a three-year period, when the memorial site was ready for planting, all the trees were approximately the same size."  
-Topos Alex Ulam

World Trade Center Memorial: Swamp White Oaks

"Former New York State Governor George Pataki wanted the trees chosen for the memorial to come from states that lost significant numbers of people in the terrorist attacks.  …the challenge for the memorial’s designers was locating the 416 Swamp White Oaks that would occupy the site when it was fully complete.  Over a period of months, Walker’s team traveled throughout New York State searching for eligible Swamp White Oaks in farmers’ fields, public works departments, and in derelict tree nurseries.  Although the shapes of the Swamp White Oaks that were located were almost identical, they came in a variety of different sizes.  To get the hundreds of different-sized trees to conform to Walker and Arad’s geometrically ordered design required a major horticultural operation at a special facility in New Jersey.  With the help of arborists from the international tree-doctor company Bartlett Tree Experts, the trees were hooked up to intravenous drips that starved the bigger ones and fed the smaller ones.  Thus, at the end of a three-year period, when the memorial site was ready for planting, all the trees were approximately the same size."  

-Topos Alex Ulam